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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
, to be having the kind of conversations we are having now that you would have before the civil rights act of 1964 was passed and before the voting rights act. . tavis: is this a short-term strategy or long term? is this a strategy to get rid of barack obama, the first african american president? or is this a strategy they think it can win long-term for them, the strategy of voter suppression? >> i think they are playing a short-term game. it is not just about president obama but holding power every level of the electoral process. but i think what they are betting now is that some of these demographic changes are still in their infancy and we do not know yet what kind of turn out there will be among younger and hispanic voters and african americans, not only in 2012 and the gop is betting they can manipulate the electoral process in such a way that they could reduce turn out on the margins. if you look of the voter i.d. laws, the literature shows that the laws can depress voter turnout by three percentage points. that is enough to swing a close election. and they are betting that at least
. when the civil rights movement happened, they shifted. i remember discussions in the 1980's and 1990's. the latino community, to be appealed to on issues like small government and family values, and they wrote off that possibility, quite frankly, with racism, seeing every brown person, every latino, as an illegal. they have done the same thing with the asian community. they used to be very republican. coming from hostile countries -- they have been driven into the democratic party with subtle and not so subtle racial appeals. i think they believe if they can do what they did in 2010, they can turn out their older white bass, and they can hold onto power, and they can -- they can turn out their older what it -- white base -- it is not a permanent strategy, but it can keep them in power for a while. and it is ugly. tavis: the new book from joan walsh is "what's the matter with white people?: why we long for a golden age that never was." she tells a wonderful story about her family and their presence. i have only scratched the surface, so you may want to pick it up. joan, thank you. >> th
-conscious policy violated her civil and constitutional rights. in 2003 the supreme court endorsed the use of race as a factor in freshmen admissions. so, representative edwards, is affirmative action still necessary? >> absolutely, i think the commitment of the american dream actually rests with affirmative action, it requires it, i hope the supreme court does the right thing. >> i think that we're looking at different neutral different alternatives in talking about these issues on affirmative action. >> yeah, i agree. unfortunately until we start making serious changes in education system and i think it's necessary, affirmative action is necessary for inclusion and for diverse environment in the university system. >> i think 'farmtive action has become a crutch that we aren't revisiting education and how we're failing so many of our kids. until we do that maybe we do need it but i think we have failed our kids by not improving education. >> there was a very interesting article in "the atlantic" which is progressive publication talking about how affirmative action was giving higher scores to lati
it be civil rights, whether it be, you know workplace safety, you know, how long you work every week, these kind of things are all things that were implemented from the top down and nobody here's going to say that the 40-hour work week was a bad idea. nobody's going to say that. that... that you know people of color can now vote. nobody's going to say that. it just, out of were they very, very popular things when they came out? no, they were not. voting right, voting rights act, civil rights act were very... very vilified in many parts of the country. but the idea that you know obamacare is not the answer, it probably isn't, but something has to be done about this problem and if you don't do anything, which is going to keep ballooning this thing. >> obamacare scares me, you know. i don't want the government knowing my personal issues or my healthcare. i don't want them to tell me that i can't go to a-- my own doctor. and right now my family physician has a sign in the window that says, no obamacare. i'm scared. >> reporter: go ahead, chastity. >> but i think at the end of the day gov
, georgia congressman and civil rights icon john lewis compared some voter i.d. statutes to literacy tests and poll taxes that kept blacks from voting for years in the south. >> i've seen this before. i lived this before. too many people struggled, suffered, and died to make this possible for every american to exercise their right to vote. ( applause ) >> suarez: nationwide pena ylowvani ois nne of 33 stitatne wesh wh voter identifin laws. it's one of five states with strict photo i.d. laws. the statutes have spawnd at least 15 legal challenges over everything from voter i.d. to early voting to culling voter rolls. in florida, the state republican party has filed a fraud complaint against the company it hired to register voters. as of friday at least 10 counties have spotted possibly fraudulent forms turned in by the firm. back in pennsylvania another eye peel to the state supreme court remains possible. in the meantime, the new rules have already been modified, prompting new coalitions to form with the aim of helping voters navigate the confusion. for more on how voter i.d. for more on ho
in this country. the book is called "the price of civilization". a conversation with professor jeffrey sachs coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome jeffrey sachs back to this program. he is one of the most important voices in our time. the director of the earth institute at columbia. his latest book is called "the price of civilization." he joins us tonight from new york. jeffrey sachs, good to have you back on this program. >> good to be back on. tavis: what has happened in this country since you wrote this book that made to put some new stuff in it for the paperback version? >> this book was about things really going wrong in america. the lack of civic virtue
be seen again in the history of civilization. climate changes are not imaginary, not theoretical, not based on computer models. it's right there in front of you. >> there is more at bill moyers.com. i'll see you there and i'll see moyers.com. i'll see you there and i'll see you here next time. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com de nrns don't wait a week. to get more moyers visit bill moyers.com for exclusive blogs, essays and video features. this episode is available on dvd for $19.95. to order call or write to the address on your screen. funding is provided by carnegie corporation of new york celebrating 100 years of philanthropy and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the coalberg foundation. independent production fund with support from the partridge foundation. a john and poly guf charitable fund. the cle meant foundation. park foundation dedicated to heightening public awareness of public issues. the herb alpert foundation. the bernard and audrey rapoport foundation. the john d. and kathryn t. mcarthur foundation committed to build a more peaceful wor
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)